Cardinals chat: Derrick Goold takes your Cardinals questions at 1 p.m. Monday

Cardinals chat: Derrick Goold takes your Cardinals questions at 1 p.m. Monday

Bring your Cards questions and comments to a live chat with Derrick Goold at 1 p.m. Monday.

    Salutations. This is the first chat of the Cardinals season that I've been able to host from St. Louis, and you know what that means ... Well, yes, it means a chance to be at home, but it also means I'll have to relocate in the middle of the chat, possibly, to get to the ballpark and begin reporting from there. We'll see how it goes. There are already dozens of questions in the inbox here, so why not dive in a little early. You've got concerns. I'll attempt to offer some answers. I imagine some choppiness, so let's see where the chat takes away ...
    Allons-y!
    Why did the Cardinals continue to take these gambles on unproven players. Can’t they see they’re wasting the best years of their star players?. Opposing teams just need to pitch around the good players To get to the weak Unproven Players
    It's a fair question. But the counter is -- how else are teams supposed to do it? The Dodgers continue to turn to unproven players like any of their young players over the past few years. Now, they outfit that group with star power all around so maybe the learning curve of some players like Urias and May aren't as obvious as, say, a team like the Cardinals or the Rays or any other team that relies on prospects becoming producers. With what the Cardinals say they can spend and what they've committed to the corner infielders they're going to have to rely on value plays somewhere. The Cardinals have taken a gamble on a young player and he turned into one of those value plays where they could get a significant contributor at a controlled price. His name? Tommy Edman. Why has Tommy Edman emerged as a young, contributor while the outfielders have struggled? That to me is the bigger question. What isn't clicking with some of the outfielders that the Cardinals are able to get from Edman or from Hicks, or Reyes, or any of the pitchers they've turned to over the recent years and gotten great returns. At some point, a team has to use its inexperienced players or else they'll never get experience. What stands out to me is a) why the Cardinals have not been able to continue the development of some hitters at the major-league level and b) their own internal evaluations on what outfielders they've stuck with and kept, and what ones have moved on, or been moved.
    Is it blatantly obvious that the Cardinals need to add an outfield bat, even if Bader comes back they are no better offensively.
    It has been for years. Look no further than the Cardinals actions. They signed Dexter Fowler to be CF and leadoff. They traded for Marcell Ozuna to be LF and cleanup. Their actions have said they see the need for an outfield bat and are still looking for the expected production to manifest.
    I’m sorry to see Dexter Fowler go down for the year. He’s a classy guy and even though his Cardinal tenure wasn’t the smoothest he was a good guy to have in the clubhouse. That got me thinking though. Did the Cardinals and Angels ever finalize that trade? Player to be named later or cash, I believe.
    It has not been finalized at last check. There are several reasons for this. One: The players to be named later have likely not played an inning since the deal was struck. They would be minor-leaguers and, as you know, the minor-league season hasn't started yet, and minor-league spring training is only now getting started. Why make a choice on a PTBNL before getting a chance to scout the list of a agreed upon PTBNL? The other part of it is the cash. If the Cardinals don't find the fit or scout the players they want, it's just a return of money. And that can happen at any time.
    I woke up this morning wanting to hear about baseball, hockey, basketball, even the Masters and all I got was football. What can baseball learn and do to make itself relative year round like FB?
    I actually think that baseball does a better job of making itself relative year round -- because it actually has things year round. When there aren't games, there are trade talks and free-agent signings, and spring training. There is actually something going on baseball almost every day of the year -- whether it's teams playing or teams talking with agents for who will play for them next. Football doesn't have that. What football has is appointment viewing and huge TV deals and all things flow from there. If you're a network that has paid a lot of money to broadcast the NFL draft, then aren't you going to use programming time for the advertising of that draft -- breakdowns, lists, and those shows get ratings, too, even though there is nothing going on except ... well, there's sometimes just nothing going on. It's like covering political polling instead of covering policy. And if the network with a lot of money invested in the NFL is creating this content that gets attention, you can bet other outlets will, too, and the echo chamber grows, and clearly the consumers want that.
    I guess what baseball needs to do is something that it is doing better -- create broadcast partners that need to fill programming hours and capitalize on the fact that baseball actually has something going on year round.
    This was a priority under Selig, who I believe once suggested that he wanted baseball in the headlines year round and that's why there isn't the signing deadlines, and free agent periods that you see in other sports, and why the Hot Stove can simmer simmer simmer all the way into late January these days.
    I almost hate to say this but I think Carpenter should get an extended look at 2nd as unlike all the young hitters + Dejong he looks like he has an idea what to do in the batters box. Maybe w warmer weather or w last years baseballs he would already have 3 HR. His defense at 2B has been fine and Edman has looked good in the OF. Your thoughts?
    I appreciate the thoughts you've given this, and that's one of the binds the Cardinals are in, for sure. They are looking at alternatives because no one has run away with the opportunity. Harrison Bader could return to center field when ready by default, not incumbency. That's not what the Cardinals wanted to see when they threw the outfield wide open for these players to grab and take playing time -- for good. As you outline, Carpenter's at-bats have produced more indications of future success than the others. Which says as much about the other hitters right now as it does Carpenter's lighting strikes of what the manager called bad luck, so far.
    With the offense not scoring much i wonder how much jeff albert will be on the hot seat
  • It was already hot entering the season. The temperature is just going to stay there.
    Aren't you tired of Schildt propping up "All Star" Paul Dejong? His two full seasons of below league average of hitting w RISP is very indicative that he's a 6/7 hitter and putting him 4 was unfair to him and actually may have sent him back to his fragile mental state he was in during those two long seasons for him w men on base.
    I don't think Paul DeJong is fragile mentally. That's such an odd thing to say about another person without knowing them. Is this some vague reference to him talking about the anxiety he had with runners in scoring position a few years ago? If so, doesn't it take some kind of mental strength and awareness to admit that publicly? Appearing in an All-Star Game is forever. It's on a player's Baseball-Reference.com page for good, and it's not going to be removed if that player gets DFA'd for the thrill of the fans or released or doesn't hit .250 the following season. It just is. What would you expect a manager to say about a player he has cast and counted on as the cleanup hitter? He's going to speak confidently about that hitter -- privately and especially publicly. I guess I expect that, and don't get caught up in the semantics or the titles, and instead focus on the production and ask about that. DeJong looks like a hitter caught in between. That balance he talked about having in Cincy shifted on him -- look at the walks, or lack there of. Look at the timing he has at the plate, and how that reveals his reaction to the fastball. Yes, asking him to be cleanup and shortstop seems like a lot -- and has for awhile, and yet the Cardinals continue to stick with this. Or, did. We're seeing that shift. And it speaks, again, the lack of back half production in the lineup.
    How bad would this Cardinals team be without Nolan Arenado?
    Well, the Brewers would have liked swept that series, so not great in the standings.
    Randy Arozarena is hitting .314 about as much as all the Cardinals outfield put together. Great work Moe !
    Clearly he's such a good hitter that he's sending a message by hitting the area code of St. Louis -- no more, no less. If he slugs .636 we'll know he's really rubbing it in.
    Is it just me or do the Brewers seem to be one of the most under rated organizations in baseball? They constantly sign players you never heard of before who are very good....Shaw for one example. I mean, where did they get all this pitching talent? They are the most patient team regarding free agency I've ever seen. Sadly, they seem light years ahead of the Cards in talent and front office thinking.
    Agreed. They are savvy. They are patient. And they have a great manager who is creative in his use and clearly has the faith and confidence of the clubhouse to allow for him to make some moves or do some things that they just believe in. Stearns, who once wanted to be a sportswriter (imagine that!), is widely regarded as one of the cleverest GMs out there, and he has the benefit of being able to wait for the move they feel is right, not the one that maybe pressure and expectations demands right now.
  • Wouldn't it make sense for MLB to spend a little money and add a 5th member to umpire crews to rotate to the booth to help w obvious calls like the two blown late inning ones that most likely changed the outcomes of the games and could even help on all other calls now not reviewed like the Cardinal call w Williams getting hit in foul territory but being called out?
    Yes. I've been calling for this and writing about this and advocating for this and talking to officials about this for ... what ... more than 10 years now: 

    Replay? Robots? A hybrid solution to avoid Joycean calls

    STLtoday.comTOWER GROVE -- In the rush last night and today to marginalize umpires and protect baseball from the travesty of the next Denkinger Joyce Gaffe, it took a pitcher, one
    Is Alex Reyes shaping up to be the closer not only in the now but maybe longer term and beyond just this 2021 season?
    The Cardinals see Jordan Hicks as their future closer. Otherwise, yes, he would be.
    Are we expecting to much from our shortstop maybe he’s a 6 or 7 place hitter
    On a team ready to win the NL pennant he might be. That would speak to that offense's depth, and his location in the Cardinals' lineup reveals theirs.
    Is this season somewhat unique in that with no minor league games until early May most expected contending teams including the Cardinals have little choice but to see how their healthy hitting talent already on the varsity squad makes out for a somewhat longer extended period of time than normal?
    Maybe. I completely get what you're saying, and I think it's an interesting point. I don't see it all that widespread, and going with 40-man players in the first month of the season to either massage service time and see what a team has isn't all that unusual. Sure seems like the Cardinals would be doing it this way anyway.
    Hi Derrick, I know it’s early but the outfield play has me worried what’s yours thoughts
    It continues to be a drag on the offense, and this is not a team that can contend for the division title with an anchor like that. The pitching has been frayed by injury and it needs more from the offense in order to keep the bullpen from becoming splintered. At the moment the Cardinals are weakening a strength (bullpen) to cover the innings exposed by the rotation, and if they also have to handle little run support that will only increase the strain and lead to a rupture.
    The Cards rotation is a bad as advertised in spring training. I called it a train wreck waiting to happen in these weekly posts. How do you quickly fix a staff era of 6.57 that ranks dead last in mlb? Kim and Mikolas might be improvements but neither and especially Mikolas is guaranteed to pitch again this season.
  • Kwang Hyun Kim will pitch this season -- and imminently. He'll soon be scheduled for a start for the Cardinals, and that could happen as soon as this weekend in Philadelphia. That's how his schedule is working. By the time the Cardinals return from the upcoming road trip, he'll have made a start for them. He came out feeling good from his outing yesterday, at last check, and they'll know more about that this afternoon. 
    Mikolas is a bigger concern, yes, and worth watching as he now starts to recreate the spring training schedule for a starter.
    Those two alone won't correct the rotation. The Cardinals need more from the pitchers who are already in the rotation, and that includes the No. 1 Flaherty, and goes from there. They need more consistency, more innings, and even if expectations are dialed back a bit for the start of the season because they're going to be so conservative with the innings/workload.
    Sure hope the .184 outfield batting can add about 70 points as the Cards need way more offense with the woeful starting pitching, Of course situational catching of the baseball would help. Am I wrong?
    I don't have the numbers handy but after years of watching baseball I feel confident in saying that a team with a .184-hitting outfield will struggle to score runs. I feel comfortable going out on that limb.
    Do you see Schildt breaking up Goldschmidt and Areanado and batting Carlson 3rd? I could see Carlson at two except he's not our best hitter and Goldy has thrived there and putting him 4 may put too much pressure on him. Areanado may be the only hitter the Cards have to fit the cleanup spot.
    This is something that has been discussed 'round the press box and I've had a long talk on the radio with Bernie Miklasz about it. Modern lineup dynamics certainly advocate for No. 3 a spot just right for Carlson, who will someday be the Cardinals' No. 2 hitter. It makes a lot of sense, honestly, but at the moment Shildt has sided with getting his heaviest hitters up right away in the first inning and away they go. I get that. They have a top-heavy lineup, and might as well get to the heaviest part first. How Carlson goes from cleanup hitter in games that matter most to not cleanup hitter right now when the offense isn't producing is a riddle -- and the answer the Cardinals have offered is that they want their lineup to be deep enough to meet Carlson where he is, not ask Carlson to be more than a rookie should be. It's wishcasting at this point.
    With everyone except the top 5 hitters batting about .100 w almost 50% strike out rate how long before management goes outside the organization and acquires an established LH outfield bat?
    This is not something they're looking to do imminently, apparently. They'll use Bader's recovery and rehab as a reason to buy time.
    BenFred made some interesting points in his recent article about Oviedo. The more I think about it, the more I’m convinced he has to be in the rotation. The Cardinals have 4 veteran pitchers this year (not all available) in Mikolas, KK, Carlos, and Wainwright that could all be gone next year. Setting up an internal rotation that would consist of Flaherty, Hudson, Reyes, and two empty spots. If Oviedo is a serious consideration to fill one of those presumed spots, shouldn’t he eat innings in a year where he has the protection of the veteran arms? Let him get experience as it would seem we know that Ponce is not a legitimate long term option as a starter.
    There's a logic to your suggestion that I appreciate, and that maybe we're not seeing in the outfield, right? There isn't that KNOWN QUANTITY to allow for the learning curve of other players. Known quantities are so valuable when it comes to lengthening the lineup -- or turning a rotation into a contender. Let's know confuse known quantities with All-Stars. That's not what I mean. A known quantity can be a pitcher who has a 4.50 ERA, pitches 160 innings, and is going to give about 50 percent of his starts as quality starts. That's a known quantity that gives the team something to count on, right in the middle. Imagine a known quantity of a .775 OPS in the outfield -- a contact hitter, who takes his walks, and scores from first on double. That's a valuable known quantity. Kim could be that pitcher for the rotation. Mikolas has been before. That's what is missing at the moment from the Cardinals. A ballast.
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