Cardinals chat: Derrick Goold takes your questions at 11 a.m. Monday

Cardinals chat: Derrick Goold takes your questions at 11 a.m. Monday

Bring your Cards questions and comments to a live chat with Derrick Goold at 11 a.m. Monday

    I agree completely with you -- that the problem with the game is that there is a lack of balls in play, and that has bogged down the pace of play. I do not think that a) eliminating shifts will change that and b) that eliminating shifts is a good thing to do because it eliminates an edge that is earned. Are we going to take away the shortstop that positions himself because of his instincts, too? What about all those times that Ozzie Smith moved himself -- shifted himself -- to get in a better spot. What about that one time Ronnie Belliard and Jose Oquendo thought, yeah, let's put the 2B in shallow right field at this time and see if that -- oh, hey, it won a series in San Diego.
    For years the Cardinals did not shift. They didn't even shift for Anthony Rizzo. And they were at a competitive disadvantage because of it. Because other teams were wiser, smarter, better at the game than they were.
    To me, eliminating shifts is the same as saying, hey, Jordan Hicks, tone down that sinker man.
    The better move would be to change the strike zone. That's how you get more balls in play. That's how you force hitters to develop their skills and tests pitchers' skills. The game is at its best when skills are on display -- and balls are in play. 
    I think Allen Craigs downfall after ankle injury could be included in the search after Oscars death and Heywards departure. He looked like a true star on the rise
    Allen Craig had a foot injury that undermined the careers of other players, and his was quite severe -- and he had a real difficult time coming back from it, for numerous reasons. But, yes, he had the profile of a top-notch middle order hitter and was doing thing with runners in scoring position that were uncanny.
    Want fewer strikeouts? It's counter-intuitive, but make the strike zone bigger.
    Amen. Amen. A thousand times amen. Preach. This is my opinion as well.
    DG,

    Have you or any of your colleagues written about the Cardinals strategy of buying out arbitration/free agent years to avoid the arbitration process? At first blush, it seems that they may have overpaid on many of these contracts. Seems that injury and poor performance arrives the year these contracts are signed.
    Not per se in those terms. They recently haven't gotten the return on say Carlos Martinez's, but Kolten Wong's certainly did. It wasn't too long ago that they got great return on the first deal for Carpenter, and Jaime Garcia ... and Paul DeJong's looks pretty good so far. It's worth a deeper dive for sure.
    I applaud Matt Carpenter's ability to reinvent himself as a hitter, but the last few years he has looked caught in between the hitter he was in the beginning of his career and the power hitter he made himself into and neither at the same time. With the benefit of knowing that the Cardinals are without a leadoff, do you think he can use that time to regain his form as a successful leadoff hitter, since he would have a clearer role presumably?
  • Maybe. There's definitely a thought internally it would help.
    All of these people hating on the Cards for Randy Arozarena will suddenly think the Cards were geniuses when he falls flat this year........ flash in the pan.
    He has hit at every level, and that now includes October.
    Is Carpenter cannot perform effectively, who would replace him? I understand Montero and Gorman are still a ways away from the Show. Any chance that the Cards sign someone like Profar?
    These are unrelated questions. A few minutes ago in the chat people were stumping for Gorman to start at 3B to begin the year or soon after. The addition of Profar is something the Cardinals have considered -- or someone like him. They have/are looking into the idea of creating additions that lean toward a matchup-like lineup. Profar's ability to play multiple positions and backup at a few and start at a few others make him appealing.
    Steroid users or players in a segregated league, who deserves an asterisk more on their HOF plaque?
    Neither needs an asterisk. One of the best things about Cooperstown is it provides context, and the more we talk about this like you have here, the better. It's one of the reasons why voting someone into the Hall of the Fame is only part of the process, and I why I keep bringing up the transgressions. We know how played when the game was segregated -- it's on the plaques by the years they played. Maybe the same will be said for the players who have that 1990s time on their plaques. Hard to say. 
    I believe that the Hall should remind all of us baseball fans of mistakes made in the past so that they aren't made again.
    Was there any interest by the organization in a swap for Snell? For the return the Rays got it feels like we could have offered something similar centered around Knizner and some pitching depth? It would probably give Yadi some negotiating power, but Snell in the rotation definitely ups our chances for dominant pitching as a foundation of this year's chances. As it stands now, I am not so confident in the rotation after Jack.
    Didn't hear anything about the Cardinals getting involved. I've heard quite the opposite when it comes to pitching. I've heard from at least three sources that the Cardinals -- as of mid-December -- were not "in" on pitchers, not that they heard.
    (Other than you know Adam Wainwright.)
  • As a Cardinal fan I have never lived farther south than 1.5 hours from Wrigley field since 1955. I have no interest in any other professional sports. As a young Cardinal fan in the 60's, my childhood cub fans couldn't razz me much. Sure would be nice to return to those days now in my medicare years.
    The Cubs may be doing their part -- at least for a year. We'll see. They've still got a crackerjack front office there. And Dan Kantrovitz is now in charge of their draft. If you think Jeff Luhnow drafted all the talent for the Cardinals in recent years, I have some bad news for you ...
    I'm late to the chat, sorry if this is way off topic. But with several players with PED issues are being held back from HOF voting, I'm curious about something. Will any voter who voted for Commissioner Selig to get in vote against a player getting in because of PED's. IMO, Selig, Don Fehr (players union leader) and the owners all knew about the proliferation of PED's and condoned it because it put butts back in seats and $$$ back in the pockets of the owners. Attendance had tanked due to strike and the HR derby seasons. Players who juiced at the right time, hit FA with big stats and got paid. Teams got attendance, TV revenue went up, owners got wealthy. Why keep the players out and let Selig in??? I find it unthinkable that he didn't know and condone it.
    So, Commissioner Bud Selig never appeared on the writers' ballot. Here is how that works:
    To be a BBWAA voter for the Hall of Fame you must have:
    -- a decade in the organization, and be in good standing.
    -- must register and show that you are actively around and covering the game.
    Once that is established, BBWAA voters vote on players who have at least 10 years of service time, have been retired for 10 years, and are qualified for the ballot, or have received at least 5 percent on previous ballots and not been inductions.
    These are things that the writers don't vote on:
    -- Umpires.
    -- Executives.
    -- Gold Glove Awards
    -- Silver Slugger Awards
    -- Players who are no longer on the ballot.
    Hope that helps.
    Please help me understand how a larger strike zone gets more balls in play. I know you've advocated that for a long time, but I can't fathom how balls below the knee become more hittable when they're called strikes. Seems a smaller zone would force more hittable pitches. Or is the argument that it would just create more walks?
    We're not talking about "hittable" sweet spot pitches. We're talking about forcing the hitter to adjust to a larger strike zone, and thus finding a way to put that ball in play and hard. If you lower the strike zone by the width of a ball, then imagine where those pitches will go when hit -- on the ground, right? Mostly? Not too many hitters are going to give up the launch angle and high fastballs to go with a golf swing, right?
    I now that it's counterintuitive, but talk to hitters about how they'd have to adjust because if they take that pitch it's a strikeout. And pitchers will just feast there. So hitters have to adjust to the strike zone -- and that, in turn, will put more balls in play on the ground, and that in turn will change how shifts look, and that is how you get the more skilled hitters showing off their skills while not asking them to bunt but just do what they want to do:
    Hit the ball hard somewhere. Producers, not directors.
    Phew. I'm not sure I even made a dent in the inbox here. There are still more than 175 questions in here, and I've run out of the prescribed time. I'll see if maybe there's a "mailbag" style blog to do from the rest to answer more questions about the Hall of Fame ballot.
    It is invigorating to know that this many people care about the Hall because that shows much baseball means to them. That is what excites me.
    That is why the ballot is a responsibility, and one I try to rise to meet.
    I've come to the end of my time here, but I'm sure there will be more forums for you ask me questions ... 
    Thanks for all the great questions, and the chance to end on a few fittings ones. Really like the fact that it took the entire chat for us to get to a question on the rules behind the writers' ballot and who actually does vote on different things. Sometimes transparency is also explaining the rules. We don't get a chance to vote for everyone -- not Dave Duncan for the Cardinals Hall of Fame and not Selig for Cooperstown, or Rose or Jackson or Marvin Miller, honestly. Or Curt Flood.
    Have to find someone else to BBQ about those than the writers.
    Hope everyone has had a healthy start to the New Year. The healthier the better because the healthier we all are the closer we get to clarity on the baseball season.
    See you next week.
    Stay tuned. Stay informed. Stay healthy.
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