Cardinals chat: Derrick Goold takes your questions at 11 a.m. Monday

Cardinals chat: Derrick Goold takes your questions at 11 a.m. Monday

Bring your Cards questions and comments to a live chat with Derrick Goold at 11 a.m. Monday.

    That time when he accepts that role may never come. The Angels made it clear that he wants to go somewhere and play, and to people who know him well it's clear that he wants a chance to play and chase 700.
    I was told, per multiple sources, that the Cardinals were having internal discussions on whether it made sense to bring Pujols back -- for selling tickets and for baseball. You hit on one of the comparisons the Cardinals would have to make. Is Pujols this year a better option off the bench than Nogowski, who is also a righthanded hitter who play first base? There is an answer to that question that people should keep in mind: Nogowski is in Class AAA right now. He's on a rehab assignment. But he's not on the bench in the majors, so it's not like they'd be choosing Pujols over someone who is already there. Dean isn't. So is it Thomas that Pujols would replace?
    Can I ask another question: Do you like the memories you have of Pujols in a Cardinals uniform, or would you prefer to have him the uniform now, coming off the bench, and that be part of the memory? You're counting on magic that may not happen. It may. It may not. Are you ready for it not to happen?
    Respectfully (and I completely mean that--this isn't Ricky Bobby "all due respect"), I'm going to disagree that Heyward had a nice season here in 2015 and "moving in the right direction." He hit the ball on the ground a stunning 57% of the time with a BABIP of .329. So, he benefitted from a lot of luck. Walked less than 10% of the time, and when the Cardinals moved him into the middle of the order out of necessity in September, he went something like three weeks with a total of one RBI despite a number of chances. Great fielder, one of the best I've seen in right. Terrific on the bases, but I thought his BA was a fluke that season--just a ton of grounders in the hole that got through, and I was glad he signed elsewhere.
  • I appreciate you digging into the numbers. Check out the fact that in the second half of that season he had a .355 BABIP, and that's something to note, but let's also look at the indicators that we can readily look up that he was headed in the right direction. He was missing less. Hitting with authority more. On the raw slash line he saw an uptick to .318/.397/.469 for a .866 OPS in the second half of that season. You can dismiss some of that if you wish with the BABIP and suggest that he was going to see a correction -- hence you're issue with my description of heading in the right direction. But please consider that within that slash line and within that high BABIP -- he was putting the ball in play and doing so harder (wish I could dial up those exit velo details) and those are great indicators. His strikeout went from 18.5% to 12.0% in that second half, and his extra-base hits leaped from one every 11.85 ABs to one every 9.95 ABs. Those are good things. And, sure, his WAR and his contributions are largely defense, but there was something going on there offensively in the second half that could not be dismissed as just fortune before he earned a fortune.
  • Also which do you prefer as far six man or five man rotation and thank you.
    I don't have a preference. I'm not hung up on the stigma or the non-traditional six-man rotation. I just know that a team that has a six-man rotation is either overflowing with pitching talent, or is hiding the fact that it doesn't have five starters that it likes, and is just trying to cobble together to magic from depth.
    Have you heard anything about the severity or long-term impact of Carlos Martinez's "celebration injury" that he said impacted his delivery during his last outing?
    Yes. As of yesterday he is not expected to miss time, miss a start, or have any issues. That was after he evaluated Sunday.
    After Oviedo & PDL, who do you think is the Next Man Up as a starter. Could Liberatore be in line?
    Parsons in the immediate future. Liberatore and Thompson are the arms racing to be the next one called and counted on in the season's second half. Both could contribute at some point this season.
    Please tell me if you can the pros and cons of the six man rotation.
    The biggest con of all is that most teams don't have starters they can count on, let alone six. So any team that goes to a six man rotation is diluting its chances of winning by turning to a pitch that wouldn't normally be in the rotation. That can wear out a bullpen, that do all sorts of things. So, it's the rare team that actually has six starters it can trust for five, six innings and count on every time out.
    The pro, this season, would be limiting the workload on the rotation.
    The con, any season, would be lopping off six starts from your best pitcher or your two best pitchers, and instead of giving you 30-33 starts, they're giving you 24ish, and those other games are being covered by someone with less ability, less consistency, or less durability. Think of a rotation like a lineup. You want your best pitchers to come up the most often, and that's why the opening day starter is the opening day starter. He should get the most starts.
    Edman, Carlson, Goldy, and Arenado is obviously pretty solid 1-4. In your opinion who needs to be in the 5-hole ahead of Molina to make this line-up frightening 1-6?
  • Either DeJong or O'Neill, who ever is producing more. Both are fine fits for the fifth spot because of the power potential they have. O'Neill's speed in front of Molina is intriguing.
    Hi Derrick, Goldy currently has a career worst 26.8 K% and 5.6 BB%. Is this something to be concerned about, or just part of his usual slow start? Thanks!
    Sure seems like it's similar to starts he's had before. As temps warm, so does he, and now as he's finding his synch at the plate he's off to Milwaukee and one of the best parks to hit in baseball.
    How does major league baseball resolve the tension between the fact that the things that slow the game and make it less interesting to watch for some are what teams believe give them the best chance to win based on analytics (no bunting, pitching for strikeouts instead of contact, hitters trending to the three true outcomes instead of contact, etc.)?
    The tail is wagging the dog. This is the question that Theo Epstein has been charged with exploring, and you're right about the trouble he faces. The answer is: Flip some fundamental part of the game, tweak it, twist it, warp it, so that it gets ahead of the analytics. There are a number of ways to do this. Increasing the size of the bases is one way because it will raise the rate of success on steals, and all of sudden the analytics will be more in favor of that. Moving the mound back is one of the other options being discussed because it would dial back the fastball, take an mph off of it by giving the hitter that much more time to make a decision. I've suggested lower the strike zone by the width of the ball. That's it. Keep the top part where it is, lower it so the sinker is back, balls in play are more, grounders are up, and watch the game, ahem, shift.
    Trevor Bauer has been doing a vlog on You Tube this summer documenting his season both on and off the field. I think this is an ingenious way to spark interest and gain younger fans for both himself and the Dodgers. Fans that might not have been interested in the sport otherwise. Have you heard any of the Cardinals players reactions to his Vlog? And, do you see any of the current Cards roster starting their own Vlog to spark new interest in the team?
    1) I have not heard any commentary from the Cardinals on his vlog, and that's mostly because access is so limited. So conversations are minimal, and they are mostly transactional these days. There's just not much conversation about different plays, other games, vlogs, whatever. There's just transactions. It's frustrating. And I think fans are starting to notice that, especially around the Cardinals.
    2) Molina seems the most likely. Heck, his Instagram is almost a vlog with how often he posts a story, and that photo he shares, etc. 
    And, you didn't ask, but I sure wish it was someone other than Trevor Bauer who was becoming this face of the game. There are other personalities out there. And I look forward to the game showcasing them. You don't have to be on social media to be a personality.
    Coincidence the team started winning when Bader returned? He shored up a shaky OF defense and is hitting. The pitching staff has gelled also, but Bader is helping that.
  • Starting pitching first. But sure, Bader brought some stability. To me there are four elements to the Cardinals' current winning surge. Let's power rank them:
    1. Starting pitching has been the key. Steady.
    2. Moving Carlson to No. 2, unlocked the lineup.
    3. Opponents. Pirates and Rockies are not great, Bob.
    4. Bader and the defense overall.
  • When a pitcher intentionally walks a batter, do the four balls count against the number of pitches he has thrown?
    Not anymore. They aren't thrown, so they don't count in the pitch count.
    I know it's cliche, but this division will come down to who plays best in Sept. Cards and Brewers play 10 times in Sept, 3 more in late Aug. If either team goes 8-5 in those games they will likely win the division.
    Probably. The schedule never disappoints.
    Why has baseball's CBA been that much more difficult to navigate compared to the other major sports and how do you see the next one playing out?
    I have to disagree on this one. The NHL CBA has been so difficult to navigate that hockey lost an entire season and half of another one. The NBA has had work stoppages, and so has the NFL, even with its weaker player union. All the other sports have had significant labor issues in the time that MLB has had labor peace. So what's that say about their CBAs? 
    The issues facing baseball are real. The previous CBA has had some unintended consequences when it comes to the player market, and some intended chilling of the market by the owners who did well in the previous CBA negotiations. That's why there's concern for a work stoppage in 2022. It's not because it's more difficult than the other leagues, it's that we've seen situations like this lead to work stoppages in other leagues.
    There is one big big big element of the baseball CBA that is different than the other leagues, notably, and could be what you're referencing here.
    There is no salary cap.
    And because there is no salary cap, there is no need for the owners to reveal all of their revenue streams to be sliced up to set the salary cap. For example, a league will set the salary cap based on a negotiated slice of the pie for players. Players will want 50/50 cut of the revenue to set that salary cap, of course, but say it's negotiated to 48 percent. Well 48 percent of what? Of whatever the owners define as revenue? That's the issue that MLB would have. The union wants a clearer, more expansive definition from owners on revenue. They want a cut of HBO MAX tech, they want to know how much the owners are making from MLB Network ... And owners don't want to give that definition, so why have a salary cap if they cannot decide on the definition of pie, let alone the size of slice to cut.
    Ok so here's another pro baserunning idea that I call the bonus runner. It comes from watching Billy Hamilton. He was so exciting as a baserunner, and as a fielder, but just never put it together offensively to truly stick. Mags Sierra is another example. Ok, so a Bonus runner rule would state that you can pinch-run one bench player for one of your starters without having to take that starter out of the game, and then and then still use that bench player like normal later in the game. This would mean you could pinch run someone like Hamilton at a key spot in the game, then perhaps pinch hit or pinch run them in the later innings before double switching them into a defensive substitution. While a wierd idea, it comes with a couple advantages - it increases the value of athletic bench players that can't quite crack it offesnively, and it gives managers a fascinating new strategic decision to make each game. Finally, it increases the amount of burner runners on the basepaths each game, increasing the excitement of that phase of baseball. To gimmicky?
    Yes, too gimicky. What is wrong with asking players to play baseball, all of it?
    After watching Kinzner play for an extended time do you think he can succeed and be a #1 catcher moving forward when Yadi finally hangs up his cleats?
  • He has the ability. Bat is ready. Improved defensively. Definitely looks like a starting catcher under the current approach most teams have for the position, which is sharing it more than the Cardinals do. A Herrera/Knizner tandem would work for Cardinals.
    Combining Cardinals' recent rules issues: If you have a pitcher who is struggling and you want to remove him before he's faced 3 batters, what if the interpreter visits the mound a couple times without the manager? The manager is then required to make a pitching change, no?
    The umpires would not allow the translator to go out. That was on them to stop. That is because teams don't want the inference of the translator carrying a message from the pitching coach or manager to the mound without there being an official visit. So the umps have to step in to stop that, and would in the scenario you describe.
    The three-batter minimum just needs to go away. It hasn't worked. It hasn't sped up games. It's got an issue, and the best way to deal with that is to get rid of it.
    Did Shildt/ Cards dodge a bullet by leaving Wainright in after the single in the 9th to face Blackmon? Blackmon had good previous AB's and when Wainright didn't really challenge him it put the tying run on base which left little wiggle room for Helsley. How nervous were you after the BB and falling behind in the count w the bases loaded and knowing Reyes wasn't available?
    I was not nervous at all. But the outcome of the game does not change my job, or my feeling. I get nervous when a game isn't finished at 10,31 p.m. on a weekday and my deadline is 10,30 p.m., and now what do I do? That's when I get nervous.
    Hummel had the gamer Sunday, so it was easy-sailing for me!
    The answer is of course yes. Yes, they did "dodge a bullet." They also "dodged a bullet" any time Trevor Story came up because he's an exceptional hitter and can change a game with one swing. The Cardinals also "dodged a bullet" by bringing in Helsley with the go-ahead run at the plate because a misplaced fastball and they lose that game. In the end, credit should go to Wainwright for how he pitched Blackmon. He could have challenged him. Could have gone cutter in, sinker away, sinker in and tried to get that ball in play that might have, might have meant a shutout. It also might have pinballed off the wall and cost the team the game. So, his ability to pitch gave the Cardinals the chance to "dodge the bullet." 
    What would happen if a review was requested in New York from two different games at the same time?
    Happens all the time. They have assigned officials working those replay reviews. And one of the changes going on due to COVID is how they're in different rooms, so the communication isn't as swift, the deliberation is less collaborative, but they can handle multiple replays at once.
    If a pitcher went 10 innings, 30 up, 30 down, but the magic runner in the 10th scored on two groundouts and they lost 1-0 would it still be a perfect game?
  • Nope. Not by definition. And, again, that's another reason why it's a farce.
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