Cardinals chat with Derrick Goold

Cardinals chat with Derrick Goold

Bring your Cardinals questions and comments, and talk to Post-Dispatch baseball writer Derrick Goold in a live chat at 2:30 p.m. Monday..




  • Has this team found it’s offensive identity yet? Can the bullpen survive this much work for the full season?
  • It has not. Only hinted at it.
     
    It cannot. Stress starting to show.
  • Keuchel and Kimbrel reportedly are lowering their expectations to a high $ one year deal. 1) would they actually help the team at this point 2) are the cardinals monitoring the situation 3) would cardinals instead prefer to pursue trade deadline pieces like Bumgarner instead of a 1 yr deal with one of the afore mentioned FA's?
  • 1) Personally, I cannot rule out Keuchel entirely as a boost for this team, but that's contingent on his health, and there does seem to be obvious questions there about a deterioration in his stuff or something that gives every team pause. A lefty look and a groundball guy would be a fit on this team -- if right.
     
    2) Not as much as you'd probably like. They aren't active at last check.
     
    3) Always.
  • Who has/had a stronger outfield arm: Ankiel or Bader?
  • Rick Ankiel. And that doesn't take anything away from Harrison Bader. He and Munoz have the strongest arms on the team. Ankiel's was just otherworldly. He was an elite, top arm in the game, Vlad Guerrero-type. Bader is above average, plus for this team and for his position.
  • Hello Derrick, longtime reader, watcher of your chats first time submitting.
    I was wondering your take on Marcell Ozuna's defense in Left field? I thought last year was a fluke jumping on the fence and watching the ball drop in the field of play and then he goes and does it again! With his bat seeming to be heating up do you think someone like the Indians might have interest in a DH in exchange for either prospects or a starter? As it seems cards seem to be not too interested in extending him? Thank you again as always.
  • Thanks for wading in. It's a fair question. I don't think the Cardinals are in a spot where they would get a great return on Ozuna given the lack of control at this point and the fact that a draft pick wouldn't be coming back in compensation. That's a drag. Also, they're not a better team without him. They're a better team with him producing and with him hitting and with him offsetting his defense with absolute monster production at the plate. Or, even the threat of monster production at the plate. That's what they need from him, and they're not going to find that elsewhere -- on the market, or on the roster, not in the way that Ozuna can provide. Seems best to keep him, and then take the pick, and maybe that's what he becomes in his next contract, a DH.
  • .626 OPS. Below avg defense. Sounds like a 4th OF to me. I’ve seen enough. Roll O’Neill’s 550k into the payroll matrix. Ty starts 3-4, Jmart starts 1-2, Big Dex gets 1-2.
  • I'm not sure what that means to roll a salary into the matrix that is already there. Sure sounds like the Cardinals already have five outfielders into three spots, given how they're using some late-game moves and scattered starts. Injuries are going to make this academic in the coming 48 hours, and then they'll where it goes once Bader/O'Neill have clearer sense of their availability.
  • Thanks for the awesome coverage from Mexico. It looked like the stadium was half empty on Sunday (at least on TV). Was that from a lack of enthusiasm for the game or something different?
  • Thanks for the compliment. It was not half full. It was about 2/3 full. It was packed around the stadium, too, and after the game there were thousands that remained in the ballpark and around it for a post-game party. It was something. The reasons outlined earlier in the chat remain: ticket prices and Palm Sunday.
  • Looks to me like Ozuna is settling into a better swing rhythm. Agree?
  • Derrick, thanks as always for your insights in these chats. Why do these players today insist on all of these head first slides? I can't imagine that the coaching staff teaches this. It just seems like they are asking for an injury. I don't ever remember Lou Brock needing to slide head first. Would appreciate your take on the matter, thanks!
  • It's a great question, and I asked a few of them this during spring training. Most of them say it's comfort. That's all. They didn't really have a good explanation beyond that. Some of them believe they have more control of the slide going in head first -- because they can move their hands around a tag, move their hands to the back of the back ground on to the bag to stay on it, and when they slide with their feet they can't do that. One other reason is the popup slide just ain't going to work much anymore because of replay. Popup and off the bag and that tag is going to be on you and that replay will show it. Every time. These seem to be the driving reasons: comfort, control, and part of it has to be what they saw when they were young and what they were taught, and the proliferation of headfirsts slides we've seen in the past decade-plus, in the wake of Rickey Henderson.
  • Do you think it’s fair that when Dexter goes 2-4 & ups his BA to .220 the narrative is that he’s “turning a corner” and that he’s the no doubt everyday right fielder? O’Neill has 4 hits his last two starts and hit one about 3 miles yesterday. J Martinez was 4-4 his last start and had a pinch hit 2 run single yesterday. They’re both better than Fowler.
  • It's fair, if it's true. It's pablum if it's just words put together based on looking at a box score and not watching the game or seeing something beyond the numbers. Were those two hits bleeders through the infield? Bunts against the shift? Or were they rockets? Where those four hits home runs or where they ricochets of the pitcher? Tell me more or your narrative is a box score and nothing more.
  • What reason will the Cardinals give for not adding Brad Miller?
  • What if they don't even bother to have one? Would that be considered practical? I'm not sure what you want to hear here.
  • What is Waino doing differently to achieve success the past two starts?
    Command of his several fastballs lower in the zone. Movement to set up the next pitch. He's got a feel for a series of pitches and he's able to use them in sequences that throw the hitters timing and expectations off. You can see that as the hitter goes up there hunting what they think he's going to do, and they get the reverse. He's found a good spot for his fastball and how it came move several different ways from the same location, late against the hitter.
    Do the reporters in the press box ever cheer for their team? I'm sure most days are business as usual, but I didn't know if you guys let loose ever in a big playoff moment a la Game 6 2011? What about emotional moments like what'll happen on June 21? Will some press members applaud or is it just another day on the job?
    Reporters in the press box don't have a team. There is a famous book in the baseball writing world that is titled, "There's No Cheering in the Press Box." I remember a time when that was actually said in press boxes, as a rule. Reporters cover the team. Deadline is going to arrive whether the team they cover wins, loses, or draws, and the only thing they're cheering for is the chance to right a story that people will remember, win, lose or draw, and really a draw would be a story that people would remember. That doesn't mean that Game 6 was just another day at the office or that the 2005 game in Houston was just another day at the office when we all had to scrap our stories and write about the series coming back to St. Louis after Albert Pujols' home run. There may be professional claps from the press box when Pujols returns because of the career he had in St. Louis, but not advocacy of what he's going to do in his next at-bat or celebration, but professional courtesy. These kind of questions always set me up for failure because it's a little like the butterfly asking the mosquito, "Why do you bite?" Not everyone is wired for a rooting interest, and for some of us it's the profession not to have one. I'm sure there are similar examples of things in your profession that fit your personality that you could explain to me -- and that's why we chase the jobs that we do.
     
    Earlier today, at the Monterrey airport, I was approached by a fella from St. Louis and asked if I went to the games this weekend. I told him I did. He asked me if I was there to cheer on the Cardinals. I said I wasn't., He asked where I was from, and I said St. Louis.
     
    "What is wrong with you -- not cheering for the Cardinals?" he said.
     
    "I enjoy the game. I like the game of baseball, not one team, or any team," I explained.
     
    "But not cheering for the Cardinals?" he said.
     
    "I like baseball. That's what I go to see, and I enjoy the game."
     
    I get it. It can be tricky to understand, and it is not for everybody. But it is for some people. I'm one of those people. I don't need a rooting interest in a game to enjoy a game. I can watch any baseball game and enjoy and find interest in it and not offer a peep or a cheer at all -- just enjoy the game. I like it that much, and that has been the case for a long time. Some people need a rooting interest in the game -- and I dig that passion, I respect it. But I don't necessarily share it. Maybe, as the gentlemen suggested, that's a character flaw. Thank goodness there is a way that I can turn that character flaw into a career, I guess. I just don't think there's anything wrong with being able to enjoy a game, even a dramatic one, and appreciate the game and the challenge of trying to write about for people who do care deeply, deeply, deeply about it. I care deeply about providing them the coverage that meets their passion.
     
    Please don't confuse the lack of cheering in the press box for lack of interest in the game or a lack of passion in the coverage.
     
    It's quite the opposite. 
    Seems like a good place to end. Touch down in St. Louis. The chat started in Mexico, got sidetrack in Texas, and has finally arrived in St. Louis. I'm going to go home and sleep. Maybe we can do this again next year with a transatlantic chat. That would be something. Until then, the Cardinals chat will return every week, usually on Mondays, throughout the baseball season. There will be another one next week. Check your local listings for the times and the hosts. I enjoyed Monterrey tremendously. The weather was gorgeous, the crowd was thinner than expected but as lively as hoped, and the mountains were, to me, familiar, as Ozuna might say. There was no cheering in the press box, but there was a lot of appreciation for the opportunity to cover an event like that. Thanks for tagging along.
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