Cardinals chat with Derrick Goold

Cardinals chat with Derrick Goold

Bring your Cardinals questions and comments, and talk to Post-Dispatch baseball writer Derrick Goold in a live chat at 1 p.m. Monday..




    We would have had one heck of a story, for sure.
    Re Flaherty being picked off against the Marlins, are runners taught never to take their eye off the pitcher when taking a lead? He looked down at the base for about a second and that was all it took.
    They are, yes. That is usually instructed. Also, runners know that.
    Why was Mikolas pulled after 90 pitches and 5 innings yesterday when we were only down 1-0? He could have gone another inning. Shildt certainly would have left Hudson in. Is there a lack of confidence in Mikolas now?
    No, there was a need for offense and Shildt bet on that move and may have put himself in a bind with the bullpen later.
    Do you think the Cardinals are in kind of a gridlock when it comes to trading? When you look at the roster, what could they really do? I keep hearing, trade Carpenter. Until Carpenter can hit to the opposite field, I don't know who would want him. I'm not being rude when I say that. It just seems like the opponents have his number? Trade Wong? Why? He's the best defensive second baseman in the league. When he gets hot with the bat, he's also a force? Trade Ozuna? Why? He's the most productive hitter right now. Trade Fowler? I'm not sure anyone would want him. Besides, he has come through with some key hits lately. The team is like a river choked with ice and there are no icebreakers to clear it. That leaves the young guys. Do we really have enough players in our minor league system that could bring back a return that would make a difference? Maybe. But lately I've heard a lot of people complaining about the players we have gotten rid of Voit, Pham, Gonzalez to name a few. Honestly, I don't see the Cardinals being able to make much of a move. We have to hope that the potential that is here starts to be realized.
    I do not believe they are in a roster "gridlock," and would not offer that as an excuse for inaction.
    Another Round on the Cards song. Feels like this chat and the Cards fan's psyche...

    All I know is that to me
    You look like you're lots of fun
    Open up your lovin' arms
    I want some, want some
    I set my sights on you (and no one else will do)
    And I, I've got to have my way now, baby
    All I know is that to me
    You look like you're having fun
    Open up your lovin' arms
    Watch out here I come
    You spin me right round, baby
    Right round like a record, baby
    Right round round round
    You spin me right round, baby
    Right round like a record, baby
    Right round round round
  • Only if we listen to the version sung by Paul Rudd.
  • Do you have any sense about how far Shildt is from a paradym change with how he uses Carp?
    RE: Question about Shildt. I was more asking about his strategical approach to the game. I don't mind him putting a positive spin on things. I know the players also appreciate his transparency and no doubt the clubhouse is in a much better place. But he doesn't appear to have modernized his approach to the bullpen (other than giving a few guys multiple innings), isn't open to an 'opener', leans heavily on vets in the lineup/rotation, resistant to shake up the lineup, etc. These are all things I expected him to be more open minded and adaptable to. Does that make sense?
    It does make sense, and thank you for clarifying. This was explored way earlier in the chat -- right as we got going with it today, honestly -- and I see where you're coming from in the ninth. If we can use the term progressive to describe a team free of the closer hook, then let's say the Cardinals weren't as progressive in the ninth as they initially advertised. Maddux and Shildt both agreed when I asked them if they had shifted away from their spring descriptions. They had. Hicks convinced them. There is the other part of performance and availability. Miller's early hiccups meant some rewriting of the plan, just as Gallegos' performance has put him in a prominent spot. I think there has been some modern use when it come to him, Gant, and to a lesser extent Martinez. There hasn't always been results.
    Derrick, I like the pizza analogy but may I suggest Steak n Shake. They've been bad for years but people still go there expecting the food to be good. The Cardinals are Steak n Shake.
    They should be Shake Shack.
     
    (Though a chocolate Coke at Steak n Shake is straight nectar, man.)
    My previous comments have not shown up yet
    Not sure what to tell you. I'm not picking by names as much as I on subject and availability.
  • I've only been a Cardinals fan for a few years now, so this weekend was my first time to see Pujols play in person. Seeing him hit that home run felt like going back into the magical piece of baseball history that I missed before I was a fan. The homer and the celebration/curtain call that followed were my favorite moments at the ballpark so far. I literally had chills.

    So my question is this - as a baseball lover, where does that stack up against other moments you've witnessed in person? What other unforgettable moments come to mind for you?
    Interesting question. It's up there. Truly. The whole weekend was a remarkable experience to watch unfold, and I was thinking today about how fortunate I am to cover baseball in a town where that is possible, heck, where that's expected. St. Louis has a special relationship with baseball and this baseball team, and I only hope to live up to the challenge of capturing that in print, daily. Musial resisting help so that he could pantomime his swing is up there. Mariano Rivera warming up alone at the All-Star Game in New York is one of the most remarkable moments I've ever seen in person. Matt Holliday's final weekend with the Cardinals was a gift for him, and I think a lot of folks will remember being there for those pinch-hit appearances and how well that was handled with him going out to left field and then being called in. I imagine as far as weekend's like this one are concerned, that was just an appetizer of what it could be like when Yadier Molina announces his retirement and takes a victory lap. Those final at-bats will be something.
    Haven't been available to follow chats live for a few weeks, and a question has nagged at me since the draft. Know the Cardinals will ALWAYS lean pitching, but it looked like they were trying to grab every college arm that wasn't attached. Just general tendencies or was there something specific at work there?
    Both. The lower ranks of the system had been thinned on pitching, and it was catching up with them all around the organization. They knew they had to refill the ranks this year and that the draft was going to be a chance to do that with the college pitchers available. It is also their wheelhouse.
    DG, it does indeed take two to tango. I’m thinking maybe the real answer to your poll about what he Cardinals need is which one will first be provided by a trade partner.
    Cards like to trade with Cleveland. Why not go after Bauer and Hand? What would that take?
    Why not indeed? Make it happen. Bauer is going to be pricey. Cleveland will want his replacement for a year or two from now, and the Cardinals probably have that in the Class AA or Class AAA staff, and then a power arm and some other upside prospect. Tyler O'Neill? Could see his power being part of that discussion.
    Your description of how special St. Louis is as a baseball city is what makes it so difficult to accept the pizza business analogy. The consistent fandom is what makes that stuff possible and fans want to see their investments reciprocated.
    I completely understand that. That is a fans right to believe that. You're right -- it would be magic if it was reciprocated. And sometimes it is. But the faith that it will be reciprocated is sometimes misplaced. You ask me where the fans can have any say in the team spending more or adding more or whatever -- well, it's not always relying on the better angels of a business. No pun intended.
    Were those suggestions you made about a trade with Cleveland enough to get Bauer and Hand or just Bauer?
    It was about starting the discussion. The type of deal that Cleveland would be looking to make.
    I would trade Wacha, Wong, and a prospect for Stroman or Bauer. Put Edman at 2nd full time and let him grow. Would that be enough?
    Michael Wacha will be a free agent at the end of the year. This is not the deal those teams want. Nope.
    Do you think Mo realizes what stopping short at building a great team is getting them right now? He passed on bench help, passed on more pitching, passed on one more bat. And here we are with a bad offense and tons of pitching injuries. At what point will they take a Yankees strategy and just stockpile a team with talent and figure it out as they go on where to fit them all in?
    I would imagine it would be when they have the Yankees' approach to building a team, right down to the Brinks truck to spend out of problems. Or when they have the Yankees pinstripes that mean Stanton will say yes to trade. Either of those things. There's a good point in here about layering insurance and paying the price of having a deep roster, but not a top-heavy or even all-heavy roster. But in the end it comes down to the players you have performing at the expectations and levels you have for them. If Paul Goldschmidt is having the first half that nets a seventh consecutive All-Star nod and MVP discussion, your question would look a lot different.
    DERRICK.

    APPRECIATE ALL THE INSIGHT, LONG EXPLANATIONS (WAINO VS. HICKS SURGERY) AMID COLORFUL DISGUST AND ANGST FROM THE FANS. WE'VE BEEN THOUGH IT AND WE DON'T SEE THIS YEAR TURNING OUT ANY DIFFERENT THAN THE LAST 3. PLENTY OF BASEBALL REMAINS...LOTS OF TIME FOR A GREAT RUN AND A SHOT AT THE PLAYOFFS,SURE. MY QUESTION: TO THE AVERAGE CARDS FAN IT MIGHT JUST SEEM LIKE THE FRONT OFFICE IS MORE OFTEN PLAYING DEFENSE THAN OFFENSE. REACTIVE THAN PROACTIVE. WAITING FOR INJURIES TO OCCUR RATHER THAN PLANNING AHEAD. WAITING FOR STARTERS THEY THOUGHT WOULD CARRY THE TEAM TO DO SO RATHER THAN GO INTO THE SEASON WITH PROVEN TALENT. WAITING FOR THE BATS TO WAKE UP...MAN. OK, GOLDY WAS A GREAT MOVE AND HE'LL BE FINE BUT THE REST OF THE LINEUP...WOW. I GET IT'S A VERY FLUID BUSINESS AND YOU WIN SOME/LOSE SOME BUT THERE ARE SO MANY MISSED PROJECTIONS ON THIS BALLCLUB AT THE END OF JUNE WE MAY ALREADY BE TOO LATE TO CORRECT WHAT WAS TO BE AND ISN'T. IS THE FRONT OFFICE AS REACTIVE AS THEY SEEM RATHER THAN PROACTIVE OR ARE WE JUST FRUSTRATED FANS THAT DON'T GET THE 2000 FT. VIEW UNTIL YOUR CHAT'S ROLL AROUND?

    THANK YOU AS ALWAYS.
  • I think there's something to this, and it's actually something that the front office acknowledges. They accept the criticism of them being conservative. They prefer the term data-driven. Mozeliak did not like when I asked him if that made them "risk-averse," there is an element to that. The Cardinals can point to deals they made out of urgency and emotion and how it cost them. They can point to deals they didn't make because they restrained themselves, trust in the process of their evaluation, and held back. They point to deals they almost made and would have regretted later (Heyward, perhaps). So, yes, there is an element of being reactive inherent in that approach. Good managers are reactive. Great managers or proactive. There's an element of the same for front offices, but probably more at stake when you're talking about moving players (like the trade story from this past weekend) or committing cash (like, say, the Angels did with Pujols and what they've been able to do since). Teams constantly prepare for injuries, but there are some that every team only reacts to. The one that Hicks is that. The Cardinals could not have been proactive to go get a guy who throws 100 mph just so they have a spare in case Hicks is injured. And before you say Kimbrel, let's acknowledge that he got a multi-year deal that would have then blocked Hicks at a high dollar from being the closer he should be. So, some injuries only invite reactive moves. The Cardinals pitching staff and the division race, as things stand right now, could go to the team that is most proactive with the next move, with the trade.
  • You ask why chatters assume the Cardinals have not been trying to make a big trade. To quote my favorite baseball writer, 2016 exists. 2017 exists. 2018 exists. We are willing to be proven wrong (in fact, we are hopeful), but we have gotten our hopes up in prior years, only to have them dashed.
    Seems like a good spot to end. We've got an excellent look at how some decisions are made, and in ALL CAPS, and we have my own words being used against me in a court of chat. I dig that. Well done. The Cardinals are hitting the road later this week for San Diego and then an interleague series in Seattle. I will be on my way to Seattle next Monday, and that means that Rick Hummel will have the keyboard for the weekly Cardinals chat. I'll be on the daily coverage for the team. Hummel has all of the Hicks news up at StlToday.com, and there is more coming with columns from Ben Frederickson and Benjamin Hochman on the Cardinals. Stay tuned.
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