Join Cardinals beat writer Derrick Goold for his live chat at 11 a.m. Monday

Join Cardinals beat writer Derrick Goold for his live chat at 11 a.m. Monday

Bring your Cards questions and comments to Monday’s 11 a.m. live chat.

    I appreciate this question more than I can possibly articulate at this time, Old Pete. Well played.
    This is nitpicking on my part, Derrick, but at the shortened end of the 1994 season the Expos were 74-40 and the Yankees were 70-43.
  • Yankees had a 1.2 run differential per game.
    Expos had a 1.1.
    Montreal played in a league with nine losing teams.
    Yankees played in a league with eight.
    I wrote that sentence tongue in cheek -- but there's more to a team in August then the standings. 
    I acknowledge that not every player on an MLB roster makes millions. But would you agree that the current gap between owners and players has very, very little to do with the income of minor leaguers or younger MLB players. This dispute is about owners keeping more versus “stars” getting to huge contracts more quickly.
    I do not agree with this premise because the argument from the players' union is not entirely about "stars" getting to big contracts quickly. It is also about the middle-tier players, like a Brad Miller, and how they've been squeezed out of the market or signing later or having to accept minor-league deals. It's also about dozens of young relievers who are churned through rosters over and over early in their career when their salary is suppressed/controlled and then they're out of the game/taking less/injured before they have a chance at the larger dollars.
    That's a major part of this labor clash: the practice of teams to go with the cheaper, younger player earlier instead of the better, older, but costlier pitcher. It's been a trend. Notice how teams turn to 0-3 pitchers -- Class AAAA pitchers in some cases, if you will -- to be long relievers, or middle relievers, and then where do you see those players go once they reach arbitration. Look at the Cardinals' practices with Bowman (Rule 5), Maness, and even this past year Gant. What happened to them as they reached arbitration and started to make money that was more reflective of their contributions ... ?
    It's not just the stars that are being brought up by the union as an example of how the market is impacting the earning potential of players. Not at all.
    Late entry for me. Aren’t Boyers and Santos stats very close with Boyers slightly better?
    Depends on who you ask on which numbers are better, but everyone should agree they are similar.
    Would Mo have fired Shildt if he did not have Marmol in the wings? It seems like a case of the FO liking one coach over another.
    Mozeliak said having Marmol made the recovery from that decision more streamlined. He did not say he made the call on firing Shildt because he had a replacement ready. It happened pretty fast for them to get to that point, and his comments immediately after the firing suggested they were just getting into that conversation. A driving reason for the firing was the decision that Shildt had one year remaining on his contract and they did not see the benefit of trying to work things out for what would just have been one more year together. That was a reasoning Mozeliak gave.
    Is there any resistance by the owners to improve the lives of MiLB players in these negotiations? Or is the Owners' opposition to those benefits solely due to the other MLBPA interests that are tied to them? What's your read on the probability that minor leaguers will have their lives improved through this negotiation process?
  • It's unrelated. The union does not represent the minor leaguers. They are not part of the CBA -- and the union has not made a move to include them under its wings, so that the owners and the union do not want that as part of the CBA, or see that as part of the CBA. So it's not a resistance on the part of the owners, it's a jurisdiction.
  • I thought the Cards might take a flyer on Colin Moran from the Pirates, who usually kills us. Do you know if they looked into him as a bench LH bat and back up to Goldy/Arenado?
    I expect they will explore that deal seconds after the lockout ends.
    But Brad Miller is not that good? Why should I pay him $7-10 mil for hitting .239 and popping 10 Hr's a year in 300 AB's and average defense when I can give my guy whom I've groomed in minors those starts for 570k and spend that other money on a closer per se. Problem is 60% don't spend that other money on anything on the field.
    I didn't say anything about $7-$10 million. You did. But you did a great job of explaining part of the issue with baseball. It's not about getting the best player, it's about getting the best value. 
    You also illustrated what that allows to happen -- teams can choose not be competitive, spend less, get the same revenue, and do so under the guise of rebuilding, restocking, or whatever it is when a team elects not to be competitive and woo fans with visions of the future. And get fans to buy into this notion of value, and seeing a player's value, and lauding the team's ability to get value.
    I'm old enough to remember when a player was measured by his production, not for his OPS on the dollar. 
    Pick one. SP, BP, DH/Utility or Shortstop. Who should the Cardinals go after next?
    And the chat brings us back to where we started. I think the small moves that would currently change the look of the team would be a bullpen addition (a reliever who could challenge to close) and a DH. The DH could be anybody at any position, but it would change the dimension of the lineup more than any of the available starters would change the look of the rotation or a shortstop would change the look of the infield.
    Who projects as Cards catcher for 2023? Also, any idea how often they will start during this transition year?
    A split job between Knizner and Herrera. Both of them will get starts at some point in the majors in the coming year. The current plan is for Knizner to get more starts earlier in the year, building off the schedule they established later this past year. Molina bought into that. But he won't miss any of the starts with Wainwright, that's for sure. They're going to try and set that all-time record.
    I agree with your response to my Miller question. My point was the price point was mid tier. Which is one thing they are arguing for. Most fans aren't wooed by "value" gets. Nonsense. If they're is an article typed in paper about what the FO hopes a player can provide, then it gets read, but team record does the talking. Better players equal better record.
  • Better players is not always the same as most-expensive players, though. Look at some of the players who helped the Braves to a World Series title. Rosario. Duvall. Soler. These are solid players, they'll make good money, but in the current system they'll be squeezed out in the near future by younger, cheaper players who aren't as good -- but provide more value. A championship team needs contributions from all over the lineup. Abe Nunez, for example. David Freese, for another example. Brad Miller, for a third example -- of a different genre, if you will. 
    Better teams get better records. Better teams know how to identify, acquire, and develop better players. And they don't go for lesser players because they get better Value on the Dollar.
    Apologies if this is common knowledge, but when Matheny was let go, was Shildt considered to be a serious target for the full-time manager gig, or was it then that they wanted to move to a more analytical manager, but Shildt's success by the end of the season was too good to move on from?
    He was a candidate. He was not the favorite. The Cardinals talked at the time of going on a search for a manager, and they put together a short list of potential manager candidates. Shildt was one, and then he did the best thing anyone could do. He had the job, so he took advantage of that head start and made the decision for them.
    Alright, one more example of how teams are run like hedge funds (Steve Cohen enters the chat) is enough for the day. Value -- get more bang for the buck, but not always the most production you can because why not save a few bucks! 
    This chat usually would have been held from the Winter Meetings. And it would have been the first of several from the brink of Disney World. Alas, we are far from the Happiest Place on Earth when it comes to baseball. It could be a while before theirs action on the negotiating front. But not before there are stories to tell and answers to give in chat. So, check back every week -- the game may stop, but the coverage won't. Promise.
    Thanks for all the great questions. The challenges to my answer. I appreciate that. It helps sharpen my own arguments -- forces me to get better gathering the facts and presenting them. 
    See you next week.
    Stay tuned. Stay informed. Stay healthy. 
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