Subscribers-only Cardinals chat with Derrick Goold

Subscribers-only Cardinals chat with Derrick Goold

Bring your Cards and MLB questions and comments to a live chat with Post-Dispatch baseball writer Derrick Goold at 11 a.m.. Our Cardinals chats this spring are for subscribers of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

    Yes, owners control the spending. That's the nature of the market. And there are more austere times ahead for the game, and spending will be limited from now through the end. The players are in a bind. But they do have leverage: They have the elite talent. So we will get a chance to see how creative they get and how creative the owners respond. But in the end you've hit on it -- the owners determine how much they spend, and there has never been a time when it has been more calculated, more risk-managed, and more similar team to team to team. It's collusion by math. And it's going to be tricky for the players to crack that.
    Derrick..regarding the poll question of which item is most unpalatable..think i will fast if this is the menu. And i second the gentleman that offered praise for your talents in these chats and columns. For me, you are a "must read". Actually, the entire staff there at the PD are top notch.
    Thank you, Jim. Thanks for being subscriber. And we have to earn your investment and interest in our work every day.
    All the attention is on the money, but the virus is the story. It’s inevitable that more than one player will test positive for each team. At what point would they cancel in those situations? What would be the tolerance for the number of positive players?
    That is what Andrew Miller has been saying as much as he can, and I hope the coverage in The Post-Dispatch reflects that. I know I've written here over and over and over again that players and owners aren't atop the power rankings when we talking about what controls a 2020 season. The virus is. Period. And really second in those power rankings is our culture and how we as a group respond to the spread of the virus.
    The answer to your questions are unknown at this point. But players and officials on both sides have said they need to be known before the first pitch is thrown. It's been an emphasis of the negotiations, even if they aren't in the headlines.
    Just my 2 cents: I would be much more forgiving and empathetic of baseball’s situation if they had spent all this time because of health concerns and figuring out how to safely get back. If that were the case, as dare I say other sports have handled things, they’d have more grace from the public. But all reports, statements and posturing haven’t been over safety, it’s been money. If Covid were the main reason MLB were not to have a season is one thing. Fine, that is understandable. Not agreeing on the finances is a wholly different reason of which I think your average fan - many of whom are in work situations exponentially more hazardous to their health and apt to contract it - are reasonable to be disappointed in.
    I think it's a fair question to ask -- is that how it's being reported, or is that how it's been? As I mentioned a few times, Andrew Miller has stressed that the conversations outside of the headlines has been about the health, safety measures and understanding the virus, and the need to have an "evolving" plan of action. I've also heard that from several players not directly involved in the talks. They've said that they have questions on that regard because less is known about it. They know what prorated salaries look like and the difference for them between a 54-game schedule and a 60-game schedule or 86-game schedule. What they don't yet know is what to do if the virus infiltrates a team, or a manager gets it, or how travel will be handled or what it means for Toronto. Lots of questions. And they're being asked. But not all of them have reached the headlines. So, is that how we -- reporters -- are covering it, or what gets attention these days? Those are fair questions to ask.
    I fault a lot of "fans" for their constant whining over the player/owner negotiations, when we're in a legitimately unprecedented worldwide pandemic that the owners/players have absolutely no control over...and for their whining over the DH, ads on uniforms, and a host of other things they seem to complain about every. single. day.

    It seems like baseball fans in the last few years have just become a bunch of "get off my lawn" boomers complaining about everything and everyone, all the time. Folks, get over yourselves and watch a beautiful game being played by truly elite performers, once it's being played again. until then, go back to yelling at clouds.
  • Twitter has given a platform to fans with any voice. It's changed the conversation. And that's true for players, too. Check out how many of them are saying things on Twitter or implying things on Twitter they wouldn't say to a reporter or put on TV. It's given them a comfort zone to say what they feel when they feel it. Same as fans.
    If anything changes I'd like it to fix blackout rules for televising games. I'm a Dish network customer and they still don't carry FSMW. It's easy to say switch to DirectTV, but they go through the same things with dropping channels because of disputes. I try to listen on the radio but the games get preempted by anything local. I understand FSMW paid the Cardinals a lot to carry their games, but I'd like a way to subscribe either directly with them for games over the internet or through MLB.TV.
    I wish. Appears doubtful. This is something that owners need to find a way to address, and just don't seem to be eager to do so, even when it comes up and generates some conversation, it just doesn't go anywhere.
    Thanks for answering my question about the unsigned draft picks. That makes sense. Curious how you'd vote on your question. I voted for the tie, but would also loathe the runner at 2nd in extra innings, but I don't have any problem staying up all night watching a 20 inning baseball game.
    Innings should start with the bases empty. That's it. Don't mind ties. I don't like carnivals.
    To me, the most disappointing thing about these negotiations is what it signifies down the road. Whether the Owners & Players would be wise enough to recognize that a protracted labor battle, similar to 1994, would be damaging to the sport. I think we can now assume that the 2 sides are so embittered that cooler heads are not likely to prevail--not today or in 2021.
    This is a good point. We do see these negotiations through the lens of what they might look like in the future, and that adds to the frustration. Players and owners do, too.
    Why not Joe Buck calling Game 7 of the 2011 WS in the background? Are you a closet Twins fan or Jack Morris fan? Is he in HOF? Game 7 of that WS was a classic, 1-0 game, when baseball was purer.
    Well, see, it's Jack Buck day at MLB Network so ... um, well ... Baseball was fine then, but I don't think we can say 1991 was exactly pure. It would have a hard time passing today's drug test, no?
    Derrick, with baseball all but doomed for this season, who is most responsible for the mess, notwithstanding heath and safety: the overpaid and oft pampered players, or the insanely rich and arrogant owners? Bill DeWitt’s comments on the profitability of baseball, despite his family’s lifetime success with four franchises, was enough to send me over the edge. He will need some new and improved public relations staff to get me back in his seats.
    The virus. If baseball doesn't happen this season, it will be the virus that got it, not any of the posturing of the two sides. They're coming to a head today, and there is mutually beneficial reasons to play, to get a season off the ground, to get over their differences, and to get past their distrust and to try and play and do so safely and with health in mind. And if that cannot happen, the leading culprit has been and will be the virus and our response to it.
    Would you happen to know how the Cardinal players are going to vote on the latest proposal and any interesting details?
    Only one Cardinals player is directly involved in the vote, and that's Andrew Miller. I do not know how he's going to vote, not after the latest round of discussions. I also haven't pestered him to ask, to be honest. Been chatting with you all. And I believe he's busy.
    Hi Derrick-the trend seems to be that as teams(college and pro) begin to gather and workout, Covid-19 cases spike. Is it time for mlb to say, “not going to play? After all, health should override games
    Look, the KBO and NPB have been able to find a way to play games, and they have done so in part because of the practices of their leagues and their teams and their players -- and, yes, the policies of their cities and countries. I spoke with an infectious disease expert this past week, and he agreed that it's tough, but it's possible. I asked him if it would be impossible to go to places where the virus is spiking, and his point: 'The virus is everywhere.' So good habits have to travel too, and that would allow a team to move and a team to stay at a distance. Testing is key. Discipline is key. Knowing where people are going and when, and how they go there and do they where a mask and social distance while there -- all part of that plan. Just as we see with the other leagues that are playing. If sports are going on in other countries, then it's possible, and what does it say not about the sport, but about the country, if we cannot get to the same place?
    Neither the owners or players are winning this battle. The virus is winning. How can they play with so many players already testing positive?
    Please see the previous answer. It's difficult. It's not impossible. But it takes commitment, and not just from the players.
    Not the first young slugger the Cardinals have brought out of Georgia. Whatever happened to Terry Fuller?
  • Terry Fuller played 63 games this past season at short-season ball. He hit .230/.343/.365 and had five homers. He also had almost as many strikeouts (80) as total bases (84). It is the most that he's played in a season in part because he was given time away from games to really work on a swing and gain experience that he did not have coming into the system. He remains in the organization, and this would have been a movement year for him -- movement into view, up the organization, possibly to a full-season roster, and movement so they know what they have in him as a prospect.
    Seems like the PR tide has turned against the owners. Thing is, they don’t seem to care. This is simply a business to many of them, the game be damned.
    I don't agree. For some, sure. But not for all.
    seems likely players will vote no on 60 games. Just a poor look on baseball when other sports have a plan
    Do they though? They have ideas for a plan. They have the benefit of having started their seasons and gotten close to the end of it. So, the NHL and NBA are bargaining from different points in the calendar and in the revenue pool than MLB. But I haven't seen a game from the NHL or NBA yet, have you?
    How soon after an agreement is made or a season is implemented before teams can start making transactions? I presume many will want to "reposition" the roster to offset the revenue cuts, and, that could present some bargains for shoppers with money. Plus, if DH is employed, and Cards are not happy with current options, do you think they will now look at acquiring a hitter for that new position?
    That's not clear. Major League rosters are frozen. That is spelled out in detail in the March agreement. It is also clear that the same does not go for minor-league rosters. They were not frozen. It will be part of the agreement in place when rosters loosen and moves can be made. Teams expect that to be when camps open, at the latest. They will need some fluidity to the rosters to be able to adjust for the new rules, new roster makeups, and, yes, their current finances. The teams with money to spend will be rare. Eager to see who that is.
    The Cardinals are happy with their current options at DH, just FYI. They like the idea of it being a place to rest regulars, get Brad Miller's power in the lineup, and so on.
    It seems certain that prospects in the lower minor leagues will miss a year of games and programmed development. Will this year provide an unwanted but maybe instructive experiment in the degree to which player development depends more on biological aging than on drills and practice? Can you imagine ways in which the results of this experiment might reshape system-wide planning for the Cardinals and other teams?
    That would imply that the teams aren't doing anything with these players, and that's not the case. They can provide different plans for the players. For the Cardinals, that has meant the Dept. of Performance working with the trainers to keep in touch with the players and give them some direction, some advice, some goals. I don't think we can just strip the players or teams of those factors and say, hey, let biology take over. It's more like that this is going to give an edge to the prospects/players who are self-starters, show initiative, and, sadly, have the best facilities to make use of. A player who drifts during this year, may not advance as he hoped or as the team intended, regardless of his biology/genes/talents and whatever input he's getting from the team.
    Prior to spring training were there any big name players that had announced this would be their last season
    Not that leap to mind, no.
    Our response to the covid 19 has basically sucked. In Texas our spread is at full speed ahead. States opened up to fast. Our incompetent governor was one of the first to start opening up, and, wouldn’t you know 2 or 3 days later he was visiting the White House. Go figure.
    As I said, there is baseball and sports in other countries. We should take note of that when assessing blame.
    What do you think Cabrera's role will be this season?
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